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Why do you love DUNE?


cegap
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I've been a Dune's fan since 1999, I've read almost all Dune books, both prequels and the originals, now I'm reading Hunters of Dune, And i simply love that Universe.

When I compare it with others Universes like Starwars or StarTrek, I found it more romantic, more human not technologically oriented, the personages are human or one kind of human, instead of rare aliens.

So, tell me what do you find great about Dune?

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Intricacies. The human foibles, the political machinations, the religious undertones, the ecological implications, how it all fits wonderfully together. Dune is not just an example of fiction as it should be, it's a lesson in attention to detail, character creation, and a host of other things.

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For me, it was always about the Atreides pug dogs.

<em> The door opposite the Duke banged open. Thufir Hawat strode through it looking older and more leathery than ever. He paced down the length of the table, stopped at attention facing Leto.

"My Lord," he said, speaking to a point over Leto's head, "I have just learned how I failed you. It becomes necessary that I tender my resig

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Intricacies. The human foibles, the political machinations, the religious undertones, the ecological implications, how it all fits wonderfully together. Dune is not just an example of fiction as it should be, it's a lesson in attention to detail, character creation, and a host of other things.

Completely agree with Dante, and couldn't have put it better than him.

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For me it was the total immersion into a wholly realistic, foreign, exotic, alluring yet frightening world.  It was so different from anything on the market at the time (was 18 then, saw the movie first before reading the novels).  The movie had me from hello and I marched straight from the theater to the bookstore to buy Dune and couldn

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Good writing that made you think (and could easily picture everything in your head). During Dune Messiah with the stone burner (no spoilers), I had to go back and read that entire chapter over again because I could not believe what just happened. Everything happened so fast. Same thing happened in many of the other books. I had to go back and reread what I just read to try and understand what happened and the consequences.

Unlike the prequels which explain everything to you, and then repeat the same info over and over to fill the books. Leave something to the imagination please. Basically with the prequels the opposite happened. I ended up skipping paragraphs/entire pages because they were not as well written as the originals.

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  • 5 months later...

I am intrested in this universe sice 2006, all because that my friend lend

me Emperor: BFD to play. xD

In the past, my father told me about it, the Dune was a cult in the 80'/90' in Poland.

Now i have to read all the novels. But i must buy it in the internet perhaps, there aren't

any in the shops  :O

naaa... I MUST read Children of Dune and notice the differences with the book and film (2003)

Bi Lal Kaifa!

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  • 2 months later...

Besides the fact that Dune is promoting many useful messages (about willpower, the role of fear etc) I think the main reason I like it is its individuality among science fiction stories.

Most science fiction stories that take place in the far future, feature a human civilization where computers are playing a dominant role along with a blusteringly rationalistic kind of science which doesn't allow any kind of dogma.

In Dune Universe though the humanity have taken a different course. The use of computers and robots stopped at some point while mysticism continued to be spread among the people and religions kept being followed.

Other traditional elements of of human history are also kept, like the governing ways, the significance of family bloodlines etc, elements which are condemned by many modernists and the way they would imagine future.

Personally I would find it most possible for the humanity to follow such a course in reality too, as mysticism and tradition are things that always played an important role in human societies since the first ones were created - we can say that they are part of our DNA. While the current fury of human about computers and exclusively rational science is something transient that was formed so quickly and will probably go away as quickly.

*To avoid misunderstandings, I am not trying to look like a blamer of technology or something. My computer has an important role in my daily life too and I see that computers have offered and can still offer a lot of progress to human if they are used correctly. I just don't think that everything in the cultural evolution hereafter will revolve around them.

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It's nothing on the level of most of you, I knew of Dune but wasn't too sure of it due to being a Star Wars fan. But I think start to play Emperor Battle for Dune and watched the film and now remake that RTS game into first person. From then on I couldn't get enough of it, reading into detail each house and how the universe words and what else I can get from it to inspire me future.

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  • 2 weeks later...

  My love for the works of Frank Herbert, and others of his genre -such as Heinlein, or Pournelle- is largely due to the fact that they were not only accurately 'speculative' in their fiction, but doggedly and faithfully humanist; their themes (however convoluted) were almost without exception centred on the lives, loves, and losses of characters with which a person could readily identify.....lol.. I've met many Harkkonens in my lifetime so far, and I can't remember a time when more than a week went by before I'd have gladly elected for the wholesale proscription of all 'thinking' machines-

  In addition, I feel it would be no less than fair to pay tribute to David Lynch and John Harrison for the reverence with which they've treated Frank Herbert's elegant and beautiful creation.

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