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  1. I use thunderbird. I never new the July 23 release was called Supernova either until mentioned above so everyone does NOT know. I much prefer version numbers to names. The version of railroad tycoon 2 I now use is from GoodoldGames - gog.com which doesnt need a CD at all as all their game are DRM free (and legal) I've not had rhe double launch problem with it. I would suspect a DRM timing issue if using a version of the executable that requires a CD as some other games that required a CD to be in the drive stopped working as the DRM they used was found to be a security risk so microsoft disabled the services they needed to run
    1 point
  2. Hi all, I got back from a trip to Paraguay last fall and realized that fine country wasn't well represented in RTII! So I've created two maps, or really two versions of the same map: Paraguay 1856 a restrictive scenario with events based on that country's early experience with railroad and the devastating War of the Triple Alliance. Paraguay 1900, more of a free-for-all map without any special events. These are my first maps, and they may well be my last, but I really enjoyed the process of putting them together. Feedback is graciously accepted. I did a good bit of research to try to get the historic settlement patterns right. I've take a few liberties, but in general I think it's pretty close. Part of what's fascinating about Paraguay is that it was this fairly dense island of settlement in central-southern South America, with sparsely settled forests and plains in every direction except south well into the 20th Century. Since then there has been explosive growth, especially in Brazil east and north of Paraguay, as the Atlantic Rainforest was converted to farmland and Matto Grosso was settled. But for centuries Asuncion, Corrientes, and a few other towns were the only urban centers in this vast area, producing unique, vibrant, isolated cultures in Paraguay and northern Argentina. Note: Export of logs and yerba mate (i.e. produce) via river ports was one of the key economic dynamics going back to the 16th Century, and is reflected in this map. I strongly recommend applying the port demand fix provided in this post and the handy dandy application instructions in this post. Disfruta! Paraguay 1856.zip Paraguay 1900.zip
    1 point
  3. There's life... I'll download your maps.
    1 point
  4. Hey @Dardanelles, now that you are a member you should be able to upload the files to your next post.
    1 point
  5. Glad to hear you found and fixed it. Your post reminded me of a similar issue I had with Firefox for....years, I'd say....until I stumbled on the cause by accident. Most detail and text is too small for my old eyes on my 21" monitor that I run at 1920X1080. So I set the scaling in Windows 10 to 150% - have done it for years. But there is one exception to that, one program that runs off the screen at that scale and can't be adapted to run compatibly with it - Railroad Tycoon II 😉. So back to Firefox. When I started Firefox, it would (almost) always open to a mini-rectangle at the top of the screen (along with the standard taskbar icon) and I would have to single click it twice to expand to normal. I gave up trying to figure out why and just lived with it for a long time. Then one day recently I opened it immediately after running RRTII at its required 100% scale. There it was - full screen (with little tiny text), no extra clicking required. That was it! It opened with its modified version of "minimized" because of my scaling setting. Opens normally when set at 100% for younger eyes. 🙂 I had experienced that from time to time before (which is why I said "almost" above), but never made the connection 'til just the other day.
    1 point
  6. Yes -- I had an RT2 backup data disk instead of my backup install disk in the optical drive (similar writing on the upper surface). Note to self: After backing up my saved games etc, don't leave the disk near the computer.
    1 point
  7. In the chaotic time of the early 90s, Stéphane Picq signed a contract over the music he made for Cryo's Dune game (1992), which he didn't understand well because it wasn't in his native French language. After a few years, the people who owned the right no longer bothered to keep the album available for sale, and Stéphane caught on to the fact that he had signed away his rights on the music for thirty years years. Well, those thirty years passed, and the rights finally returned to its creator. And now, a few years later, this legendary soundtrack CD, "Dune: Spice Opera", finally lives again: https://stphanepicq.bandcamp.com/album/dune-spice-opera-2024-remaster I previously posted here when I acquired an original CD of this rare soundtrack. Stéphane Picq said on the Facebook group that there will be a physical release of this too, so I'm really looking forward to that.
    1 point
  8. Hi, I've created a PAK file extracting/packing CLI tool, very easy to use, and almost a clone of WWPAK, but WWPAK is an old DOS program, my one is written in Rust (this was my learning the ropes project). Should compile on Windows and Linux, 64bit or 32bit. Made this for myself mostly, maybe someone will want to use it as well. Not sure yet how to share it, will probably upload it to git-hub soon I have uploaded it here: dunepak on GitHub. Screenshot:
    1 point
  9. The game is unbalanced, especially in the early 1800s. Maybe it's just too easy to raise big bucks and build inter-city long lines decades before they emerged in real life. Still, you can make money on freight if the distance is short and the locomotive is cheap. Income shifts somewhat in the "2nd century", and then pax & mail dry up in the 1960s after the announcement of air travel. In my US History map, I gave certain freights some added value: You can reduce the costs of building rails by producing lumber and steel. I created some fuel cost triggers as well. And yes, I separate freight depots from passenger terminals in all but my lowest-traffic towns. It's also a good idea to keep slow freights on their own tracks where they won't be frozen out by a steady stream of express trains overrunning them. Carefully placed diagonal crossings can allow a network of freight lines to be completely isolated from an overlapping net of express lines.
    1 point
  10. Mirrored it on my site now http://nyerguds.arsaneus-design.com/dune/dune2x/
    1 point
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