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Dune Tabletop Games Coming

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It looks like the movie release has some side effects:
https://boardgamegeek.com/blogpost/79891/dune-board-miniature-tabletop-role-playing-games-c

"With this master license, we are excited to collaborate with our peers and leverage their unique expertise to realize a complete spectrum of game types and authentic experiences,' continues Brisigotti. Slated for late 2019, their first collaboration is a tabletop role-playing game from Modiphius, publisher of celebrated games such as Star Trek Adventures, Fallout: Wasteland Warfare, Conan, Mutant Chronicles, Achtung! Cthulhu, and Tales from the Loop.

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I'm actually surprised they risk making a tabletop game instead of a video game in the age where smartphones have become the center of today's life (which is shameful in and of itself).

They might've been better off remaking the three Dune RTS games we discuss here :P

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You don't want a C&C Rivals clone. Trust me on that one.

I wonder what happened to that indi game. That one looked good as a Dune 4.

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Trust you? Who are you? A Rivals player? :P

And I did say smartphone life is a shame. A complete and absolute shame.

Yeah, we don't want Dune for phone. We want Dune and C&C for PC and only PC.

 

One last thing: Rivals? A) not a C&C game. B) I never heard of Rivals. Is it good?

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I was being sarcastic.

 

Why, EA? Why..? 😭

Edited by TAK02

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Sarcasm aside. I think that the board game makes a good chance... IF.... they finish that product.

PS. Dune2 can be played on the android. And works even better then using a mouse and keyboard.

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On 9/11/2018 at 6:37 PM, X3M said:

Dune2 can be played on the android. And works even better then using a mouse and keyboard.

Considering it was the RTS-precursor and had "one-unit" limit and not that many (or any, AFAIK) keyboard commands...

This shouldn't come off as a surprise, but it still does.

Edited by TAK02

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There is another game that uses the same concept. It is called Warfare Inc.

It works more like C&C. Multiple units can be selected and commanded. There is RPS in weaponry. A good 14 mission single player campaign. And that for free. But that aside.

 

This board game. I already had my eye's on it. But my experience tells me that this is one of those "great" idea's that will not see the day light. Why I have that conclusion? I know of a couple more games that tried the same. But all failed. These last 3 couple of years.
On the other hand. This group of designers has put out multiple games out there already. They know what they are doing. And I think it is brave of them to try Dune. further more, they are on BGG. Which is a gathering place of the best designers for all I know.

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I'm playing Rivals, but disgruntled.

Are they referring to the tabletop board game (simulator)? I have that and it has a lot of tabletop games available to play online with others. That would be really great; but perhaps they have to make the physical one before porting it to the simulator.

One of my favorites is the Cryptozoic DC deck building game.

Edited by djcid
additional thoughts

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Boardgames are going through a massive renaissance right now so not too unsurprising. I imagine they are much cheaper so it makes sense especially for something with a potentially niche audience.

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On 11/15/2018 at 10:49 PM, Khan said:

Boardgames are going through a massive renaissance right now so not too unsurprising. I imagine they are much cheaper so it makes sense especially for something with a potentially niche audience.

I don't know if it is true about the renaissance. What I am sure of is that you need to sell at least 1,000 copies to get in the profit zone. If not, more.

It also depends on the components, quality and quantity, that a board game designer wants to add to the game.

The weight of the boxes. The shipping. And of course the right game with the right target audience. It is better to only follow up after the audience has gotten wider. It is already small for the films etc.

All together, it needs very careful planning and creating. Also, testing etc. I have yet to see test requests on this game. There are several stages to this. And if they are not followed sufficiently, things will go haywire at the end.

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Not sure why you aren't sure about the renaissance. Take a look at an LGS there are a huge number of new board games coming out. Also the rise of other geek cultures into the mainstream have helped remove stigma of boardgames being boring. 

Edit: article about the renaissance:

https://move38.com/blog/smart-board-games-in-the-age-of-screens/

http://nothingsacredgames.com/the-cost-of-a-board-game-money/

This guy quotes that it cost him 30,000 usd to make a board game. Per unit a big studio could probably get the cost down due to economies of scale. 

 

Obviously a studio would need to Employ people so that cost will be to be factored in but I would imagine they would just approach a company that already make boardgames and partner. Further reducing risk. 

 

One other thing : a good videogame can take many years and far more testing than a boardgame. 

Edited by Khan

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30,000 usd equals 1,000 copies. It is the turning point for a medium board game of medium quality.
But depending on experience in making board games, target audience, theme etc. I'd say that only 1 out of 10 makes it that far into the 1,000 copies. Now decrease the chance by a factor 10 while only doubling the number of copies. I think you can tell by now that a game like MtG is a godlike success.

Most board games are usually made by just 1 person. Or 2 people who thought of a game together and made it a bit more professional.
Then a play test is done several times. By itself, friends, family, blind play test by normal players, perhaps by professionals.
Who then sometimes hire an artist. For all the pictures.
Who also might hire someone to check on the manual for correct rules, grammar etc.
Who also sometimes outsource a game factory (for printing the board, cards, pieces etc.)

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