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The connection of a Golem to a Ghola


TMA_1

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The myth of Golem or Gholim comes from kabbalist origins during the middle ages. Jewish sectors were constantly attacked by anti semites and other forces, and so a rabbi finally took charge and performed a ceremony that would create a monster. He placed a mystical incantation called a Shem in the ground and spoke various kabbalistic mantras. Then finally used the true name of God to summon the Gholim. It then proceeded to go out of control and destroy instead of protect.

Anyways, in the hebrew language when an "im" or "em" is attatched to an object or thing it means it is plural, but without that the word for that object or thing usually ends with an a sound. For example in Genesis it says in the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. The actual word for God was Elohim, which literally translates to "Gods" plural. The Jewish language never contained the figurative "plural for amplification of Glory or power", like greek for example. If something was plural, no matter how holy a word or how powerful the meaning of that word was, it was just what it is stated, a Plural. Anyways the singular for God is eloha or eloa. I have researched this and have found that the plural for Ghola is Gholim or Golem.

does this have to do with the myth of the Golem?

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I'd say probably...

But the key to why gholas are called so would maybe to know why a word is plural in Hebrew... Why is God put plural? Why is the word "golem" not "gola" instead? What's this weird habit to put a singular object plural in Hebrew and what does it mean?

Then we'll get an idea of the ethimology of Herbert's "ghola". Perhaps gholem is somewhat a very powerful entity, complete entity, an entity that is form of many? Ghola would thus be some kind of sterilized version of the plural-gholem, the ghola being a controllable creature (as we know). We can also see that God and gholem aren't controlled in Jewish litterature.

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To be sure, "ghoul" is an ashkenazi (or jidis) form of hebrew word "golem". Golem is a matter brought to life by a medium between the world and God, what is usually a cabalist. Cabalist ("ba'al shem tov" - lord of His name) uses the holy God's Name, Jhvh as a mantra to copy the creation process of the 6th day.

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Only the fact with singular of 'elohim, which cannot be eloa, because it is like if you said sunglass. Real singular can be only word 'el, but this is used as name of one canaanite god, so Jews used only magnified names like Elohim ("Majestic God"), Elshaddaj ("Omnipotent God"), Elelion ("God over gods"), and, the great shem, Jahveh (acronym of "He, who is").

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elohim is not "mejestic God" It is the plural form of God. El was used in the bible as well, it is used a lot actually. Eloa is also used. There are many titles given to god, like El Sheddi, blah blah. These are specific titles and are always placed in the singular. elohim is different though.

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