Jump to content
rkcerman

Just found this forum. My people!

Recommended Posts

Hey guys,

Got back to playing this game last weekend after years of not playing, and gotta say, it still rocks. I actually appreciate it even more now, as the last time I played it I didn't really understand stock market, bonds, stocks, dividends and all that stuff + my knowledge of English wasn't as good at the time (this was about 10 years ago, when I was 14). Now as I'm older, I appreciate the economic aspect of this game even more, and it blows my mind that stuff like short-selling is implemented.

Anyway, though I wasn't very good at this game 10 years ago, I believe I picked it up now very fast. Just so you have an idea of my skill level, this week, I managed to get Golds in Iron Seed and Handle on the Bread Basket (Hardest difficulty both), Gold in the China map scenario (19th century so wasn't too difficult) and Silver in the Heartland scenario. Getting Gold in Heartland - or even better, the Secret Gold, as I found the thread posted by MagLev where he managed to do that - is now my main focus.

It makes me so happy that a community devoted to this game still exists! Sure, it's not super active, but at least it's something, and there is so much great content in here. Spent the whole evening yesterday going through the old threads and reading your strategies. I'm amazed at how much you guys have mastered this game. Haven't tried the patches you've posted here, will get around to it soon though.

Anyway, I've still got some questions about this game that I hoped you could help me with:

1. Afaik, it's possible for a player to create multiple companies in a single scenario. Under what circumstances should I take advantage of this?

2. When would you use Issue Stock and Buy back stock?

3. In scenarios like Heartland, the goal is to have the company's book value at certain level. No mention of net worth. Is there any reason to even play the stock market and focus on increasing your net worth? Or to even have dividends above $0?

4. Just to confirm, the price of all the factories always stays the same, no matter the current economic status or how lucrative they are, right? This is one of the few aspects of the game I find mildly irritating! It would open up so many new strategic possibilities.

5. Also, as far as opportunity cost goes, does it actually make sense to be buying factories?

6. Super vague question, but if there is any useful info that you feel like I should know at this stage, please do tell!

Richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/22/2018 at 2:34 AM, rkcerman said:

1. Afaik, it's possible for a player to create multiple companies in a single scenario. Under what circumstances should I take advantage of this?

I haven't needed it (and my favorite maps don't allow it), but there might be a scenario where access to different countries is restricted, so you'd need to build track with first one and then another to achieve some goal. There's also stock manipulation where you "use up" a company to build something, get your own money out, and then start your "real" company to use what the other leaves behind.

2. When would you use Issue Stock and Buy back stock?

I rarely issue stock, but early on I might need the cash. I buy back stock for a number of reasons. I want control of my company so I can't be fired or taken over. I want as much of its profit as I can get. I want to support the price when I am personally in debt (on margin).

3. In scenarios like Heartland, the goal is to have the company's book value at certain level. No mention of net worth. Is there any reason to even play the stock market and focus on increasing your net worth? Or to even have dividends above $0?

If you can control your company with >50% of the stock, then you can pursue strategies that might enrage stockholders short term. Also, in some scenarios, there might be time to make some kind of killing in the market and then use the cash to found a new company with a nice large stake.

4. Just to confirm, the price of all the factories always stays the same, no matter the current economic status or how lucrative they are, right? This is one of the few aspects of the game I find mildly irritating! It would open up so many new strategic possibilities.

5. Also, as far as opportunity cost goes, does it actually make sense to be buying factories?

It has been a long time since I bought factories (they're not for sale in my US History map). They're a sink for company cash that has nothing else to do. They're a way to recover the money you missed at places you're overserving (demand falls to 1 or 0, but the factory gushes cash).

6. Super vague question, but if there is any useful info that you feel like I should know at this stage, please do tell!

Yes, US History is an entire campaign in one map. It has about 500 events.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hi Richard,

Good luck for Heartland Secret Gold!

 

Things you might want to know:

You might have seen them already. The 1st and 2nd are in my view the most imbalanced parts of the game, but of course they define gameplay.

 

1. Passengers and mail are your cash cow. Their distance computation is bugged. You receive insane revenue for hauling them as far as possible. And of course they have no specific destination in mind making the standard play to haul them about as far as you practically can.

 

2. Corners are treated like grades. It was awhile since I looked it up, but I think it's about +2%. This is then added to any actual grade. Needless to say that this hobbles the majority of the Express engines which typical have lower power and therefore less than ideal graded performance. Straight tracks are the way to tackle any grade and also bear an unfair advantage on flat-ground. A high grade on a corner is a killer.

 

3. You decide how big your "cities" are. The demand at a particular city-station is dependent on the number of houses that station covers. The more houses you can cover the better. Having 8 will count as a proper city needing all consumer goods. >8, More houses = higher demand.

 

4. For best profits try to pair up equal size "cities" that are as far away as possible connected by as straight track as possible, then reap express windfall.

Edited by MaglevForever

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×